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CT Sea Grant

Juliana Barrett
Assistant Extension Educator in Residence
Connecticut Sea Grant College Program
University of Connecticut
1080 Shennecossett Rd.
Groton, CT  06340-6048
Phone: (860) 405-9106
Fax: (860) 405-9109
juliana.barrett@uconn.edu

Juliana Barrett became a member of the NEMO team in 2006. She is an Assistant Educator in Residence with Connecticut Sea Grant and the NEMO program. As an ecologist, her focus is the coastal habitats of Connecticut. She works with the towns and groups working on the conservation, restoration and enhancement of coastal areas. Juliana is developing programs to assist coastal community leaders with technical matters related to the impact of land use on coastal habitats, riparian buffers, habitat management and restoration of coastal habitats.

Juliana is the co-author of The Vegetation of Connecticut, a Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection publication. Previously, Juliana was the Geoffrey C. Hughes Tidelands Program Director with the Nature Conservancy in Connecticut, and also did private consulting. Juliana has a Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, a M.A. from the Department of Earth and Planetary Science at Johns Hopkins University, and a bachelor’s degree from Smith College in Biology.

CT NEMO

Michael Dietz
CT NEMO Program Director
Center for Land Use Education and Research
University of Connecticut
1066 Saybrook Road
Haddam, CT 06438
Phone: (860) 345-5225
Fax: (860) 345-3357
michael.dietz@uconn.edu

Mike is a water resources educator, with primary responsibilities for running the CT NEMO Program. Mike’s position is jointly held between the Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR) and the Connecticut Sea Grant College Program at the Avery Point campus. In addition to assuming the leadership of the NEMO Program, Mike will contribute to Sea Grant’s sustainable coastal community development program.

He received both his Masters and Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut, focusing on stormwater and low impact development (LID) techniques. Upon his graduation, he worked with the Connecticut NEMO program from 2005 to 2007 on projects related to LID. He left Connecticut in 2007 to take a position at Utah State University as an assistant professor and extension specialist in sustainable living, where he continued to work on stormwater monitoring and LID, in addition to green building, energy conservation, and water harvesting. He was director of Utah House, a demonstration house for green building techniques.


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